Regional Emerging Artists in Residence

The Regional Emerging Artist Residency provides emerging, Southeastern-based artists with six months of free studio space at Artspace, giving them time and space to explore their work in a supportive and thriving open studio environment. Artspace offers two residencies every six months.

Summer Artist Residency

The Summer Artist Residency provides an established artist with a month-long studio opportunity to work on a specific project in Artspace’s Gallery 1 during the summer, culminating in an exhibition at the end of the month. 

Pop In Artist Residency

The Pop In residency program focuses on community engagement and provides an artist with a month-long studio opportunity to work on a project of their choice. During the residency period, Pop In Artists engage with the Raleigh community through a collaborative project or through teaching a workshop. 

Universal Access Artist Residency

The Universal Access Residency is exclusive to artists who identify as having a disability. This residency is designed to be flexible and can be easily modified to accommodate different disabilities.

The residency was initiated in 2019 and was made possible through the actions of past Operations + Finance Manager, Megan Sullivan, who received The Betty Siegel Universal Access + the Arts Award; which recognizes the substantial achievements of Arts Learning Community for Universal Access members who complete all three years of the program. Sullivan chose to use the grant included as part of the award to fill a need in our community.

Ann Roth

Upfront Gallery

Ann Roth is our 2022 Universal Access Artist in Residence and will be working in the Upfront Gallery during the month of June. Leading up to her exhibition, Ann will host a series of workshops, where participants can help paint and cut components that will then be used in the installation she is creating at Artspace as part of her residency.

What if I played with brush strokes or invented other ways of applying color and pattern to a surface? What if I cut the paintings into curved and irregular weaving elements? What if I intuitively interlaced them into new compositions?

Ann Roth

Upcoming Dates + Workshops

All events are free! To sign up, or for more information on these dates and gatherings, please email Oami Powers, opowers@artspacenc.org, our Programs + Accessibility Coordinator. 

  • May 21, 11am-3pm // Paint-a-Thon, Drop in and help paint pieces that will later be used in Ann Roth’s installation at Artspace. This gathering will be part of this month’s installation artist meet up. No registration necessary.
  • June 1 //  Residency begins
  • June 3 // Paint-a-Thon, Drop in and help paint pieces that will later be used in Ann Roth’s installation at Artspace. No registration necessary.
  • June 11 // Small group workshop where participants will help cut and construct parts of the installation. Please email Oami Powers to sign up.
  • June 18 // Small group workshop where participants will help cut and construct parts of the installation. Please email Oami Powers to sign up.
  • June 25 //  Small group workshop where participants will help cut and construct parts of the installation. Please email Oami Powers to sign up.

Artist Statement

Beauty in the world around me and life’s quirks, mysteries and capacity to change directions unexpectedly inspire my creative process. I play with subtleties, complexities, illusions and the interaction of colors. 

I was a weaver until 2018 when the physical demands of the dyeing and weaving processes and the evolution of my imagery caused me to look for other ways to interpret my thoughts and observations. 

Now I paint sheets of paper or Tyvek with color and patterns, cut them into expressively curved or angled lengths and intuitively interlace them to form new compositions. 

I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease in 2004 and am convinced my art making practice keeps me moving ahead as the disease slows me down. Most importantly, making these interlaced paintings is totally fun, inspiring, challenging and rewarding.

These pieces are for sale, as are all of the smaller works on my website, www.ann-roth.com. You can reach me at aproth2@bellsouth.net with questions or sales inquiries.

Aliyah Bonnette, detail of oil and applique on quilt

Aliyah Bonnette

Studio 215

Aliyah Bonnette received her BFA from East Carolina University in 2021. She is a former Artspace Summer Art Camp intern, as well as teaching artist.

Bonnette’s work tells the story of a Black woman’s journey to find herself. She combines improvisational quilting to stitch together the stories and memories of Black women across generations. Through the addition of paint, she constructs stories of her own Blackness, femininity and sexuality beyond the violence and hyper sexualization that Black women face in a colonized world.
Work by Aliyah Bonnette

Artist Statement

“My work is heavily influenced by my relationships with my late grandmothers, my ancestors, or my ‘Kindred’ as I call them. I discovered quilting three years ago at age twenty after learning that quilting may have been used in the underground railroad in an African American Studies class. When I first told my grandfather about my sewing, I learned he had kept quilts and fabric from my late grandmother after she passed away. She was a quilter in the 1970s while living in Georgia and had learned to sew by watching her own mother. A few days later, my mother and I pulled up in her car and were surprised to find barrels full of my grandmother’s unfinished quilts and both used and unused fabrics. I was stunned. It was a sign that my grandmothers were alive within me, guiding me all along. And my grandfather was the messenger that would lead me to the purpose of my current body of work.

Over time, I have taught myself a process of improvisational quilting to physically connect to my grandmother and the practices of my women ancestors. By incorporating the very fabrics and unfinished quilts she touched and sewed herself, my practice becomes a space to stitch together the stories and memories of black women across generations. My work tells the story of a black woman’s journey to find herself. My figures are representations of me and the women around me. Through them, I construct stories of our own blackness, femininity and sexuality beyond the violence and hyper sexualization that we face as Black women in a colonized world. My Kindred who have lived through slavery and Jim Crow directly aid me in the process of art-making while simultaneously guiding me on my own path of womanhood. The figures within my work are women living in comfortable environments where they may reveal their authentic self. They are Black women, often partially or fully nude. We take ownership of our bodies and refuse to be controlled by imposed standards of race, gender or sexuality. Guided by the Kindred, both myself and my figures may find our paths to our true selves, imagining who we may have been without the interference of colonization.”

By incorporating the very fabrics and unfinished quilts she touched and sewed herself, my practice becomes a space to stitch together the stories and memories of black women across generations.

Aliyah Bonnette
detail of acrylic painting by Freddie Bell

Freddie Bell

Studio 215A

Freddie Bell received a BA in painting from Warren Wilson College. Bell’s identity as a queer and transgender person informs how they see and move through the world. They are interested in exploring the binaries and systems we have created for ourselves as individuals and communities. Iterative, graphic shapes, saturated color, and pattern become the visual language to explore these themes. During their residency, Bell will explore the ways grief is processed.

Acrylic Painting by Freddie Bell

Artist Statement

“My identity as a queer and transgender person informs how I see and move through the world and is a fundamental influence in all my work. I am interested in exploring the binaries and systems we have created for ourselves as individuals and communities. Language is important for expressing our experiences, but labels become limiting when we become too attached to them. Working primarily with acrylic, I explore this through loose shape and varied repetition. I enjoy playing with color and its relationship to shape and space. I draw and paint intuitively, allowing the piece to direct next steps. Currently my focus is on grief and the physical body. My father passed away earlier this year and I often notice that grief as a physical knot in my chest or gut, reminding me of having a knot in my shoulders or back. This sparked a curiosity about fascia, the thin tissue in our muscles and body. I’ve been researching how the fascia functions and when there’s a tightness in our body it’s often caused by something happening somewhere else in the body – a parallel to the impacts of grief. I’m exploring this relationship by taking motifs that are familiar to my style and using them in different ways with new shapes. These new forms are reminiscent of cells and muscles. I use the relationship of pattern, form, and color to express both tension and release in my new paintings.”

I am interested in exploring the binaries and systems we have created for ourselves as individuals and communities. Language is important for expressing our experiences, but labels become limiting when we become too attached to them.

Freddie Bell