Upfront Gallery & Lobby

Ursula Gullow, Pop In Artist in Residence
One’s a Crowd
Upfront Gallery

August 4 – September 30, 2017

First Friday Gallery Walks:
August 4 + September 1, 2017
6-10pm

Ursula Gullow, Detail of Artspace exhibition

After a month long residency during July, Ursula Gullow exhibition One’s a Crowd is on display in the Upfront Gallery. The exhibition is a collaborative community mural project, featuring over 100 self portraits from community members alongside work Ursula created during her time at Artspace.

The next step of the collaboration is for participants who created a self portrait to come by and pick up their portrait anytime September 5-30. As portraits are taken home, a mural painting by Ursula on the wall underneath will be revealed.

Gullow shares, “My background in sociology informs a visual investigation into the individual’s relationship to themselves, each other and their landscape. I emphasize the in-between spaces of story-telling and bodies in motion. I am conceptually swayed by political theory and popular media.”

ARTIST BIO
Ursula Gullow
was a recipient of the North Carolina Regional Artist Project Grant in 2009 and Penland School of Craft’s Williams and Womble Scholarship in 2014. Venues for her solo exhibitions include PUSH Gallery in Asheville, NC, Malcolm E. Blowers Gallery at UNC in Asheville, and Anthology Film Archives in New York City. Her paintings are exhibited at Haen Gallery in downtown Asheville. She was an artist-in-residence with The Gil-Society in Akureyri, Iceland in 2005 and at Spark Box Studio in Picton, Canada in August, 2016. Gullow teaches painting and design classes at A-B Technical Community College and was named “Outstanding Continuing Education Instructor of 2014.”

Brenda Brokke, Amy Friend + Leatha Koefler
Homebound
Lobby

September 1 – November 25, 2017

First Friday Gallery Walks:
September 1, October 6 + November 3
6-10pm

Detail of Homebound, work in progress

Site-Specific Installation:
Tedd Anderson

Davie St Entrance

Tedd Anderson’s mural features the iconic “dry space” characters for which the artist is known set in a landscape filled with swirling, topographic lines, jagged edges, and meditative objects and shapes. A banner with a poem scrawled on its surface runs through the piece, bringing the imagery into a cohesive whole.