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A new site-specific installation by Lincoln Hancock

Lincoln Hancock I’ll Be Your Mirror (2013) Mirror, light, found photographs, vinyl, plastic curtains, gouache, sound composition and amplification.  Installation in fitting room, dimensions variable. Music by Heads on Sticks, image courtesy of Lincoln Hancock

Lincoln Hancock
I’ll Be Your Mirror (2013)
Mirror, light, found photographs, vinyl, plastic curtains, gouache, sound composition and amplification.
Installation in fitting room, dimensions variable.
Music by Heads on Sticks, image courtesy of Lincoln Hancock

Our Pop-Up space in North Hills has so much: an exhibit, an interactive project that enables people to contribute thoughts on what the next generation needs to know (http://www.ethnographic2013.com), art activities you can make and take home with you, and classes for youth and adults.

The only thing we were missing was a work of art that responded directly to the space. That is, until Lincoln Hancock stepped up and offered to do something about that. He came up with I’ll Be Your Mirror, an enchanting piece that responds to what was once a fitting room. You have a month to see it-it closes with our Pop-Up space on June 29.

Here’s his statement:

This work explores the fitting room as a private, yet other-oriented, space where identity is often in flux. The presence of the lyric “reflect what you are/in case you don’t know” (from the Lou Reed-penned song of the same title) functions as both a suggestion and a question. Reversed text extends the space, leading the viewer to read the illusory space created in the reflection. A series of found photographs from the portfolio of a fashion model evoke the presence of another, and the act of representing. The room responds to a visitor’s entrance, as vanity lights flicker on and textural echoes of a melody fill the space.

The song “I’ll Be Your Mirror” — containing perhaps Reed’s sweetest lyrics — points inevitably to Warhol, the Factory and the oft-fraught nexus of self/other, interior/surface, and celebrity psychodrama. Originally released in 1967 as the B-side of the single, “All Tomorrow’s Parties,” the song is, in a sense, a reflection of that A-side’s concern with an other-oriented construction of identity. In this installation, the presence of the song’s deconstructed melody haunts the viewer. The fitting room becomes an intimate space in which one might consider the presence of her own reflection, the visible manifestation of self, as a locus of identity, comfort, strength and possibility.

Artist Bio

Lincoln Penn Hancock is an artist, designer, musician and educator with a background in philosophy and an advanced degree in graphic design. He has exhibited paintings, video and installations in a number of Triangle galleries and public spaces. His work was recently featured in a show exploring the intersection of text and image at the North Carolina Museum of Art. During 2012, he served a six-month term as Regional Emerging Artist-in-Residence at Artspace. He is recipient of a 2013 Regional Artist Project Grant from the United Arts Council of Raleigh. Lincoln also teaches Graphic Design to undergraduates at William Peace University.

About Annah Lee

Annah Lee is the Director of Artistic Programs at Artspace.

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